Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis in the UK. It affects around 8 million people. It most often develops in adults in their late 40’s or older and is more common in women. People with a family history of Osteoarthritis are also more likely to get it.

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition. It affects the cartilage of a joint and makes it’s movement more difficult. This leads to pain and stiffness. Once the cartilage starts to roughen and thin, the tendons and ligaments have to work harder. This can cause swelling and the formation of bony spurs within the joint. Major loss of cartilage can lead to bone rubbing on bone, altering the shape of the joint and forcing the bones out of their normal position.

The most commonly affected joints are the hands, spine, knee’s and hips.

 

 

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis affects more than 400,000 people in the UK. It often starts when a person is between 40 and 50 years old. Women are three times more likely to be affected than men.

Rheumatoid arthritis occurs when the body’s immune system targets affected joints. This leads to pain and swelling. The outer covering of the joint is the first place affected. This can then spread across the joint, causing more swelling and a change in the joint’s shape. This can result in bone and cartilage to breaking down.

Physiotherapy and Joint Pain

Physiotherapy for Arthritis can be highly effective in reducing joint pain and improving mobility. There are a number of treatments that can be used to help control symptoms and advice from a physiotherapist can help you to understand what happens to your joints and muscles when you have arthritis. Physiotherapists can also work with you to put effective management strategies in place.

Get in touch today

Call our team

033 0333 0435

Email us

[javascript protected email address]